Are you looking for a fast-track solution to shed that extra weight? Are you considering the heavily social media-promoted keto diet to achieve your dietary goals? Actor and activist Jameela Jamil is here to tell you why that's a really bad idea...

"Celebrities and influencers. Please stop pushing the keto diet (on)to people who do not need to follow the diet for medical reasons," Jamil began in the message. "It can create all kinds of disturbances for people's bodies, (including their vital organs), and they do not have the same access to healthcare that you do."

She also took this opportunity to point out the hypocrisy in 'before-after' pictures, stating that the latter is obviously the result of extreme editing.

A photo posted by Instagram (@instagram) on

"Stop with the (often bulls***) before and afters (especially the ones where in the 'after' your trousers are higher/your bra is more supportive/your hair and makeup is done/you're smiling/the lighting is better/you're using airbrushing) during the predatory time for women especially around their weight."

Addressing the public, she also debunked myths related to the keto diet in general.

"To anyone seeing these posts about keto and 2-week weight loss, it's water weight, not real fat loss, and take it from someone who did every diet under the SUN, the weight comes back thick and fast and then some as soon as you reintroduce carbs," she revealed.

"Most humans need carbs," The Good Place actor added, before telling fans to "stay away" from fad diets. "If you really want to change your body to whatever, please do it for the right reasons, the right way, slowly, not guided by some newfound thin-fluencer and their fast weight loss guru/predator."

She also included several screenshots of what appeared to be direct messages from fans, who shared their horror stories following the diet.

From pancreatitis to gall-badder removal and brain level imbalances, the after-effects shared by the people should give everyone pause.

"Don’t take my word for it. Just read every medical journal article you can find on it. Learn the history of it, and if you fit that history, if you need it medically, I hear it can be extraordinary for certain serious health issues," Jameela added.

"But if not ... you are needlessly risking creating health issues because our world not only obsesses over weight loss, but how fast we can do it. That is not sustainable and it’s designed to fail so that you stay on the diet merry-go-round forever," she said.

Encouraging a healthier relationship with nutrition that doesn't involve binaries of good and bad, the star hoped her fans would be grateful for the food on their table. A much-needed reminder for all of us.

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