“I call it being self-partnered,” says Emma Watson.—Photo by Alasdair McLellan/Vogue
“I call it being self-partnered,” says Emma Watson.—Photo by Alasdair McLellan/Vogue

As Emma Watson approaches 30 in April, the actor and activist says she’s very happy being single — but it took some work to get there.

“I never believed the whole ‘I’m happy single’ spiel,” she said in an interview with British Vogue for the magazine’s upcoming December issue. “I was like, ‘This is totally spiel.’ It took me a long time, but I’m very happy [being single]. I call it being self-partnered.”

Too often society forces the sad-single-female rhetoric onto women who choose to remain unattached so good on Watson for talking about the most important and longest relationship you'll ever be in: the one you have with yourself.

She says 2019 was a “tough” year because she “had all these ideas” based on what life is supposed to look like at this age.

“I was like, ‘Why does everyone make such a big fuss about turning 30? This is not a big deal…’” she shares.

“Cut to 29, and I’m like, ‘Oh my God, I feel so stressed and anxious. And I realise it’s because there is suddenly this bloody influx of subliminal messaging around. If you have not built a home, if you do not have a husband, if you do not have a baby, and you are turning 30, and you’re not in some incredibly secure, stable place in your career, or you’re still figuring things out… There’s just this incredible amount of anxiety.”

Watson will be appearing on screen this December as Margaret “Meg” March in a new adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women, a role which combines some of her passions: literature, film and exploring women’s lives.

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