This. This is why we need more female filmmakers.

In his latest truly illuminating interview, Karan Johar has revealed why Anushka Sharma's character, Alizeh in Ae Dil Hai Mushkil "had to die".

KJo believes it to be his number one film, being perfect in every way. When called out about Ayan's (Ranbir Kapoor) toxic pursuit of Alizeh, he went on to say, "Yes, the last track met with many polarised responses and rightfully so, but I was like Alizeh who doesn’t reciprocate Ayan’s feelings, didn’t love him, she has to die. I wrote this character. He loved her so crazily. She could’ve loved him back, why couldn’t she? So she got cancer and she died."

Before you wonder whether Karan Johar actually thought to punish a character by giving her cancer for not being able to control who she loved, know that it's true, for he added, "Well, she got punished, I wrote it. See, a filmmaker is a God, you write, you create and you destroy" (This is verbatim, we kid you not).

Johar also finds nothing wrong with Ayan's aggressive displays of "love" for Alizeh claiming "he was not inappropriate to her."

When reminded of how he was very, very much so, he responded, "I didn’t look at it like that, to me he was just a puppy who was just in love and it’s not like she didn’t love him. She just didn’t love him in the way that he wanted her to love him. About the physical aggression, I apologise. That is not something I had thought of earlier and I should have."

Of course he failed to see anything wrong with the physical aggression earlier, this is what happens when you romanticise harassment folks (thanks DDLJ).

There's more: "But I am not going to be apologetic about his relentlessness and his love, because he loved her even after she was gone. He never stopped loving her. That’s the way I feel about the big loves of my life. I will never stop loving them and I may not go so relentless in my pursuit of love but I believe Ayan was a lover."

Things only kept getting worse; Karan Johar also romanticised the thought to making one feel guilty for not loving them back.

"Oh, it’s a great feeling [guilt tripping]... self-pity is something that I love. After a bad relationship, I take 2-3 days to feel victimised."

For someone who has made jokes on "the woman card," it does sound hypocritical to hear him glorify feeling victimised over such issues. And also, guilt tripping is a manipulative tactic used by toxic peeps to mentally and physically abuse others. For Karan Johar to glamourise this is yet another reminder of the misogynistic traits that Bollywood encourages in its 'romantic' heroes.

Heck, we have our fair share of Bollywood films where poor ol' Shah Rukh Khan chooses one of two women because he can't control who he loves. In KJo's very own Kuch Kuch Hota Hai, he was rewarded by being with both since Rani's character died.

For Karan to say this in 2019, for him to be proud of punishing Anushka's character for not controlling who she loves, yet claim "I have been raised by my mom and my aunts and they’ve always been cooler than any men in my life. It’s natural to me. I am a feminist," in the very same interview, it concerns and confuses us a lot.

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