We get the lowdown on what the filmmaker is up to now, after his debut film failed to make a mark
We get the lowdown on what the filmmaker is up to now, after his debut film failed to make a mark

Filmmaker Rafay Rashidi has come a long way from his debut film Thora Jee Le, which released earlier this year.

The director believes he had taken some big risks for his film and while Thora Jee Le failed to make its mark, Rafay feels he made himself known for his out-of-the-box style of work.

Currently, the filmmaker has a lot on his plate. Speaking to Images, he reveals, "I've gone into television production and partnered with Momal Entertainment. We cater to all channels. The multiple projects that have launched are adding to my experience because I meet so many seasoned people from the field."

He also states that Thora Jee Le provided many lessons to help him along in the field.

Rafay with the cast and crew of his debut film
Rafay with the cast and crew of his debut film

"From my debut as a film director, what I learned was the art of involving people's second opinions, not rushing into things and taking my time," shares Rashdi.

"I'm a staunch supporter of new talent but the presence of a senior actor is great for screen value," he adds.

With Momal Productions, Rafay has already spearheaded a few dramas and is working on many more projects.

"O Rangreza and Gustakh Ishq are on air right now. Baadshah Begum is in the pipeline. Dildarya, a special telefilm, is being shot right now. We might be also going into a period play. I'm also a part of Hum S. Talent. So yes I'm quite occupied. But I will definitely make another feature film! You'll hear about it soon I hope."

For Rafay, a project is worth taking on depending on the content and how much of an impact it can create.

"Content evolution is my game, I mean we're reaching the digital age. You have Turkish dramas playing on your channels, which means that our audience is ready for an evolution. No one is there to take a risk. we just wait for someone else to make it, like Bollywood, so that we can copy it. We need to take risks. I took a chance introducing a whole new roster of actors in Thora Jee Le but now those actors are making something of themselves. My risk paid off!"

Rashdi believes that television is a powerful medium and should be used as such.

"I want to tell the stories of the people. We need to understand that TV is influential and so are actors. People can get inspired from what they see so we should give them content worth taking inspiration from."

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