Beyonce wants her 40s to be fun and full of freedom

Published 11 Aug, 2021 01:40pm

Images Staff

The superstar reflected on her life, career and what she values in a recent interview.

Photo: Harper's Bazaar
Photo: Harper's Bazaar

Beyonce Knowles Carter is one of the most recognisable women artists in the world in on September 4, she's turning 40.

She sat down with Harper’s Bazaar to reflect on her life and career so far and what she hopes for this new chapter in her life.

"The first decade of my life was dedicated to dreaming. Because I was an introvert, I didn’t speak very much as a child. I spent a lot of time in my head building my imagination. I am now grateful for those shy years of silence," Beyonce said.

Her teenage years were about hard work. "Vision and intention weren’t enough; I had to put in the work. I committed to always being a student and always being open to growth," the 'Single Ladies' singer explained.

"No one in my school knew that I could sing because I barely spoke. My energy went into Destiny’s Child and the dream of us getting a record deal and becoming musicians. If something wasn’t helping me reach my goal, I decided to invest no time in it."

She revealed that she sacrificed a lot of tings and avoided distractions. "I felt as a young Black woman that I couldn’t mess up. I felt the pressure from the outside and their eyes watching for me to trip or fail. I couldn’t let my family down after all the sacrifices they made for me and the girls. That meant I was the most careful, professional teenager and I grew up fast," she said.

"I wanted to break all of the stereotypes of the Black superstar, whether falling victim to drugs or alcohol or the absurd misconception that Black women were angry. I knew I was given this amazing opportunity and felt like I had one shot. I refused to mess it up, but I had to give up a lot."

For the singer, her 30s were about starting her family and her life becoming more than her career.

"I’ve spent so many years trying to better myself and improve whatever I’ve done that I’m at a point where I no longer need to compete with myself. I have no interest in searching backwards. The past is the past. I feel many aspects of that younger, less evolved Beyoncé could never f*** with the woman I am today."

Beyonce is a notoriously private celebrity, one who rarely posts pictures of her family online. "We live in a world with few boundaries and a lot of access. There are so many internet therapists, comment critics, and experts with no expertise. Our reality can be warped because it’s based on a personalised algorithm," she told the publication.

"It shows us whatever truths we are searching for, and that’s dangerous. We can create our own false reality when we’re not fed a balance of what’s truly going on in the world. It’s easy to forget that there’s still so much to discover outside of our phones. I’m grateful I have the ability to choose what I want to share."

One day she decided I wanted to be like Sade and Prince. "I wanted the focus to be on my music, because if my art isn’t strong enough or meaningful enough to keep people interested and inspired, then I’m in the wrong business. My music, my films, my art, my message—that should be enough."

I think like many women, I have felt the pressure of being the backbone of my family and my company and didn’t realise how much that takes a toll on my mental and physical well-being, Beyonce said, adding that she hasn't always made herself a priority. "I’ve personally struggled with insomnia from touring for more than half of my life. Years of wear and tear on my muscles from dancing in heels. The stress on my hair and skin, from sprays and dyes to the heat of a curling iron and wearing heavy makeup while sweating on stage. I’ve picked up many secrets and techniques over the years to look my best for every show. But I know that to give the best of me, I have to take care of myself and listen to my body."

She also spent too much time on diets with the misconception that self-care meant exercising and being overly conscious of her body. "Mental health is self-care too. I’m learning to break the cycle of poor health and neglect, focusing my energy on my body and taking note of the subtle signs that it gives me."

My wish is for my 40s to be fun and full of freedom, she said. "I want to feel the same freedom I feel on stage every day of my life. I want to explore aspects of myself I haven’t had time to discover and to enjoy my husband and my children. I want to travel without working. I want this next decade to be about celebration, joy, and giving and receiving love. I want to give all the love I have to the people who love me back."